A Travellerspoint blog

Last Full Day on the River Is Tomorrow

It's routine but tomorrow is the last of it. Up at 5:30, coffee at 5:40, breakfast at 6:00, the river at 6:30. But, there are some housekeeping details to get out of the way. Here are a few catch-all details that some will find of interest and I will just glob them together.

Interesting Fact: when we come back from dinner, on our front porch are two guards. One is a dog and the other is a frog. Here they are. In an earlier post, I said I thought there were four three-bedroom "suites" here. I was incorrect; there are two. Our search boat is spartan but it gets the job done. Another frog lives in a hole high in the wall of my shower and climbs down the wall on suction cup feet at night to eat bugs. I don't have to tip him. I did sort of step on him my first night here but we both survived that shocking event.
fd722b40-7a6a-11e8-8ce4-e35bb6da19e5.JPG1a3217e0-7a6b-11e8-8ce4-e35bb6da19e5.JPG416a8770-7a6b-11e8-8ce4-e35bb6da19e5.JPGOurSearchboat.JPGShowerFrog.JPG
The twists and turns of the river can easily been seen on Google Earth. Here's a screenshot. If you want to spend some time with it yourself, go to Google Earth and search for Porto Joffre Brazil. That's your starting point.large_a700b190-7a6b-11e8-8ce4-e35bb6da19e5.png Jaguar Retreat is located at 17 degrees 09’51.35”S 56 degrees 34’56.98”W

The Jaguar Retreat is spartan to a fault.

My 12 x 12 room contains two twin beds pushed to opposite walls, a sink and a shower/toilet combination. There is no closet or hook so there is no need for hangers. The lighting is stark and harsh. There is no spot to put your suitcase except atop one of the twin beds. If there are two people sharing this room it would be quite difficult. The WiFi in the room is excellent but there is, of course, no TV. None was expected to be sure. The air conditioning is great.

The rooms are arranged in a unique way: three of the above are ganged together and reached by entering through a small living room type space which contains one love seat and a mini-fridge. The lighting, again, is harsh. No more than two could gather here and they would be cheek to jowl.

Across the way in another building there is a community dining room with a long table which is surrounded by fourteen straight backed chairs. Food is served family style on a buffet. There is a TV on the wall but it isn’t hooked up to anything except, perhaps, your own computer. My MacBook Pro doesn’t have an HTML jack so it won’t work for showing pix from the day or video shot from the boat

There is no bar or common area with relaxed seating where you can meet and mingle with other guests. There is no spot to sit and read, watch the river go by, gab with other guests or drink a beer. That shortcoming is severe. The only place that would serve that purpose has a pool table and a BBQ but it is occupied by staff; not guests. Weird.

The staff is wonderful, anxious to please at every turn. They will do laundry for 5 realis per item. I hope socks are a single item. A bag turned in before your morning boat trip will be returned after you return from your afternoon boat trip unless it doesn't dry in time. Mine didn't. No mind; it will be back tomorrow.

The food is plain but quite good. The beer is cold. There was a bat in the dining room this morning but it hid behind the picture of the Last Supper so I didn’t betray it to our hosts. Gene insists it is a vampire bat but I am uninformed on this subject so am unable to confirm or deny that fact.

That’s my take on Jaguar Retreat. I would rave about the place if only that common gathering space existed.

What does it look like when a jaguar is hunting? Like this:

What does it look like when you're up a lazy river? Like this:

What does it look like when there's a radio call about a jaguar sighting? Like this:

What does it look like when a jaguar is trying to camoflauge itself? Like this:

Posted by paulej4 10:11 Archived in Brazil Tagged caiman pantanal cuiabá jaguars

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Login